Buy Jigsaw Puzzles at HobbyWonder
Jigsaw Puzzels 1000 Pieces Plus at Hobby Wonder
JigsawPuzzles at HobbyWonder 800 Number

Puzzle Categories


Charm (2)
Drawing Supplies (3)
Games (48)
Lego (51)
Model (20)
Puzzle (1622)
  3D Puzzle (376)
  CD Puzzle (10)
  Flat 2D Jigsaw Puzzle (1190)
    Animals (258)
    Arts & Paintings (268)
    Castles (37)
    Christmas (13)
    Churches (5)
    City (95)
    Clock (1)
    Disney (18)
    Fantasy (48)
    Flowers (17)
    Food (17)
    Globes and Maps (23)
    Lord of the Rings (6)
    Monument (29)
    Nature Scenes (118)
    People & Celebrities (36)
      Children (5)
      What If (4)
    Place (54)
    Sports (3)
    Street Scene (8)
    Vehicles (53)
  Metal Puzzle (32)
  Puzzle Accessories (14)
  Wood Puzzle (0)

Puzzle Manufacturers

3D Puzzle
BJ Toys
Briarpatch
Buffalo
Castorland
Clementoni
Educa
FX Schmid
Hanayama
Hasbro
Infinitoy
Lego
Matchitecture
Modello
Nathan
Puzzle Plex
Ravensburger
Rovio Learning
SBG
SunsOut
Supertek
Think Fun
Unicorn
Wrebbit

Puzzles by total pieces

3D - 500 Pieces and Under
3D - 500 to 1000 pieces
3D - Over 1000 pieces

2D - Under 1000 pieces
2D - 1000 pieces
2D - 1001 to 2000 pieces
2D - 2000 to 5,000 pieces
2D - 5,000 to 10,000 pieces
2D - Over 10,000 pieces

Five Cent Piece - SunsOut Puzzle

Five Cent Piece painted by David Behrens 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle manufactured by suns out five-cent-piece-sunsout
Title:    Five Cent Piece
Artist:  David Behrens
Size:     Height = 28 inches
             Width = 23 inches
Pieces: 1000
Year Released: 2013
Manufacturer: SunsOut

The Buffalo nickel or Indian Head nickel was a copper-nickel five-cent piece struck by the United States Mint from 1913 to 1938. It was designed by sculptor James Earle Fraser.

As part of a drive to beautify the coinage, five denominations of US coins had received new designs between 1907 and 1909. In 1911, Taft administration officials decided to replace Charles E. Barber's Liberty Head design for the nickel, and commissioned Fraser to do the work. They were impressed by Fraser's designs showing a Native American and an American bison. The designs were approved in 1912, but were delayed several months because of objections from the Hobbs Manufacturing Company, which made mechanisms to detect slugs in nickel-operated machines. The company was not satisfied by changes made in the coin by Fraser, and in February 1913, Treasury Secretary Franklin MacVeagh decided to issue the coins despite the objections.

Despite attempts by the Mint to adjust the design, the coins proved to strike indistinctly, and to be subject to wear—the dates were easily worn away in circulation. In 1938, after the minimum 25-year period during which the design could not be replaced without congressional authorization had expired, it was replaced by the Jefferson nickel designed by Felix Schlag.

Home | About Us | Our Products | Ordering | Shipping Info | Search | Contact Us


CAN'T FIND WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR? CLICK HERE!!!